Eye to Eye #11 CHRIS GRANT

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We’ve been away for a few weeks and what better way to return than with an interview with fellow Liverpudlian Chris Grant. Chris is signed to Alan McGee’s new label 359. 359; in case you didn’t know (and if you didn’t you must’ve been living under a rock for the last few months) are hosting a new night in Liverpool’s District. District is the former Picket… located in the Baltic Triangle area of Liverpool? Still with us? Good….

We are not here to review or try to convince you how good an artist is, we just want to present you with a few words from them and point you in the direction of their songs, vids, gigs etc. Ultimately, the Liverpool Eye is about spreading the word, because if it catches our Eye we believe its worth a shout…

Chris kindly answered a few questions for us…

TLE: What are you listening to at the moment?

CG: Courtney Kardashian’s voice. It’s not a song, I’ve just got that show on the TV. I find every one of them sisters extremely attractive so it’s just on basically.

TLE: What’s the most Rock and Roll situation you have found yourself in?

CG: I was in bed hungover once. Got woken up by a phone call. Some weird American guy started talking to me about my songs telling me that he had heard about me. I was like…“Fuck off, who are you, how did you get my number, I’m in bed piss off kind of attitude? Not interested “. I Don’t even remember what else he or I said. He said who he was, didn’t know him. Went back asleep. Woke up. Got on with my day…. Anyway Mcgee phones me later that day, “Did Seymour Stein ring you?, he likes your stuff I gave him your number”. Turns out it was quite possibly the biggest name in music. This guy signed Madonna…. Is President of Warners US and runs Sire Records. Probably sold about 200 million albums, good albums too, important albums. Huge, huge figure in this game. That’s when I actually started a revolution from my bed. It can be done. That was Rock N Roll. People chase this guy. He chased me. I knew I was doing something right. He forgave the snotty attitude. He loves my album ‘It’s Not About War’. Now I know who he is. I’m pleased. The brains I had went to my head in the end.

TLE: What’s been your favourite gig of yours so far and why?

CG: I played on a huge stage in Liverpool a couple of years ago to thousands. It was a big festival. The gig was ok. Sound was awful as it always is on big outdoor stages. We played great but that’s not why I care. My Grandad was 80 odd and he made it to watch us before getting ill. He watched me and my brother own it on a massive scale to a lot of people. I know he was proud. There was a huge Liverbird behind us 20 feet tall. He loved seeing us up there. He passed away last year. I love that he seen that. He could never get to club nights at his age and stuff. This worked for him, It was sunny, It was outdoor, It was daytime. He watched us achieve something. I love that gig for that reason. He loved it. It’s that simple. I know he loved it. Words couldn’t describe how proud he was of us both. It’s great to know that now he’s not around. He knew we was on our way. A man can take a lot from knowing that about a man he loved. I would have hated it if he didn’t see us start to make a wave. He did. I’m lucky in that sense.

TLE: How do you describe your sound?

CG: Honest.

TLE: What do you make of the Liverpool Scene at the moment?

CG: I don’t. I’m a song man not a scene man. Scenes don’t have songs. I’ve ignored scenes since the start. It’s working for me. If you have any sense follow suit. Do your own thing always.

TLE: How has your music evolved since you started playing?

CG: Greatly.

TLE: Who are your influences and what was the last music you bought?

CG: Bob Dylan and Neil Young got every move right so it stops there for me. Last record I bought was by Miguel called Adorn. Not all pop music is shite. This dude sounds like Marvin Gaye and the tune is contemporary cool with the right amount of musicianship. The rest of his album is weak bar one. If he lets me write him a song or sings one of mine he could be better. His voice is great. I respect it. The likes of Olly fucking Murs are put to bed by this guy. Pop music can be great. It’s rare but it could be great. This Adorn tune totally swoops Marvin but why wouldn’t you. He nailed it. Stop trying to be Robbie Williams; Olly Murs!! He doesn’t even know who he is or who he’s being himself so you trying to be him… is just awful. This Miguel gets it, we need to go back to the roots of it. Pop music that is. He is like Prince on stage with a voice like Marvin Gaye. That’s good pop music. He is a pop star. A good one…

TLE: What are your rehearsals generally like?

CG: A laugh.

TLE: What’s the ultimate direction for your good self?

CG: Left.

TLE: How do you write your songs?

CG: Magick.

TLE: What do you think the music reflects about you or is it pure escapism?

CG: Reflects my being totally and let’s other escape. The way it should be.

TLE: What’s the hardest aspect of being a solo artist?

CG: There is nothing hard about it. At all.

TLE: What’s the one rule that must remain unbroken?

CG: Never fake it.

TLE: How did Alan Mcgee come to hear about you?

CG: I sent him a message in 2006 on MySpace saying “Sign us now while you have got the chance”. Exactly that. Nothing more nothing less. Now I get it that every idiot in a band will now do this but I must add. He only got back because I was fucking good. So you now have to be at least as good as me to get heard. Just like I had to be at least as good as Noel to get heard and obviously I’m much better than him…and much better now. So good luck with that. I mean it too. I really do. Oh and you have to be a handsome bastard. Forget that bit. The libertines got a pass on that one.

Chris and his fellow 359 label mates play @ District tonight…if you’re lucky you may still get a ticket…

Check out Chris’s links below to delve a little deeper…

Facebook

Twitter

Debut single ‘It’s You’ download link

District

Eye to Eye #10 DEATHROWRADIO

DRR

We only came across these guys recently on 6 music and to be honest we are quite ashamed of the fact. Obviously we are not slagging off 6 music but the fact we have only just discovered DRR leaves us feeling somewhat lacking when we pride ourselves on our musical knowledge… That said its a delight to discover a band that have been recording for 10 years or so and you can dive headlong into their back catalogue…
DEATHROWRADIO used to go out under d_rradio and their sound differs to that which they are putting out at the moment… We will let you have a delve and discover the difference…

deathrowradio is Chris Tate and Paul Christian Patterson and they kindly answered a few questions for us…

TLE: What are you listening to at the moment?

Paul: From Monument To Masses, Human Don’t Be Angry, Mogwai – ‘Les Revenants’.

Chris: Laura Nyro, Paul Pena, WAR.

TLE: What’s the most Rock and Roll situation the band have found themselves in?

Paul: Playing at the Paradiso, Amsterdam in early 2007.

Chris:don’t know how Rock and Roll this is, but it was a huge thrill when John Peel first played us on the radio and then invited us to play a Peel session. Sadly he died before we could record it, which was inconsiderate of him.

TLE: What’s been your favourite gig so far?

Paul: Truck festival nine, in summer 2006.

Chris: For me it was probably the gig Paul mentioned in the last question, at the Paradiso. That’s where we met Lianne Hall, and that was powerful in so many ways.

TLE: How do you describe your sound?

Paul: Forever changing and hopefully progressing.

Chris: To be honest, we usually try not to describe it.

TLE: How long have you known each other and how did you meet?

Paul: We met around 1995, possibly at Chris’ birthday party. Or maybe it was shortly before that, in one of the houses we shared with friends.

Chris: We had quite a large group of mutual friends, all pretty much living between two houses. There were lots of parties, lots of music and not much sleep.

TLE: How has your music evolved since you started playing together?

Paul: Our music evolves as we do, we just try to keep improving and keep doing the best we can.

Chris: Our plan was always to evolve and change our sound, to change direction entirely every so often. We like to throw it all on it’s head, just because we can. We always loved it when artists change the style of their music, but the music maintains a recognisable certain something.

TLE: What are your rehearsals generally like?

Paul: Good fun!

Chris: Definitely good fun, although these days they’re also pretty focused. We try to make the most of it because we know how hard it is not having a space in which to rehearse. But it’s great fun, constructive fun.

TLE: What is the ultimate direction for the band?

Chris: Forwards.

Paul: To continue making music and hopefully making people feel good.

TLE: How do you write your songs?

Chris: It depends on the style, it’s nearly always different for each album. Every time we change style, we learn or invent a set of entirely new skills and take a new approach.

Paul: We start with a basic musical idea; a riff, a melody or a chord sequence, and then allow the songs to take shape around that.

TLE: What do you think the music reflects about you as people, or is it pure escapism?

Chris: We try to always remember the beautiful feeling of hearing music which really moves us, and we try to put some of that into what we do. So our music hopefully reflects our love of the escapism that beautiful music can provide, and the way music can soundtrack certain times. That was always a big part of our plan, and that’s partly why we’re called deathrowradio.

TLE: What’s the hardest aspect of being in a band?

Chris: Lack of funds, without a doubt. I’m concerned that young people in this country with original, vibrant ideas won’t be able to fully realise them in the future, if things keep going the way they are. If creative people aren’t lucky enough to have money and their artistic ideas don’t fit with what MPs consider to be commercially viable, they won’t be nurtured the way they should be, especially if those ideas are even slightly far out. True art has nothing to do with making money, but the UK government think art should only be made with financial profit in mind, and they’re taking steps to make that the norm. Having said that, the best art often comes from having something to kick against, so something very culturally exciting could be just around the corner. I hope so.

TLE: What’s the one rule that must remain unbroken?

Chris: Never kill anybody.

Check their links below and immerse yourselves in their sonic hocus pocus….

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

MYSPACE

 

 

 

Eye to Eye #8 MOKOOMBA

Mokoomba

This week we stray far from Liverpool and even beyond our shores to bring you Mokoomba. From Victoria Falls the Zimbabwean six piece are playing the Africa Oye festival in Sefton Park on Sunday June 23rd.

Mokoomba are, Mathias Muzaza: Lead Voice, Backing Voice & Percussion. Trustworth Samende: Electric, Nylon & Mute Guitars & Backing Voice. Abundance Mutori: Bass & Backing Voice. Donald Moyo: Keyboards. Miti Mugande: Percussion & Backing Voice. Ndaba Coster Moyo: Drums, Backing Voice & Beatbox.

They kindly answered a few questions for us.

TLE: What are you listening to at the moment?

Mokoomba: On tour, we have been listening to a lot of different kinds of music, especially learning more about the other bands that we meet at the festivals we play.

TLE: What’s the most Rock and Roll situation the band have found themselves in?

Mokoomba: We have had quite a few “rock and roll” situations considering where we are coming from, peak of which was our performance live on the Later with Jools Holland show. The performance generated lots of excitement and interest in our band and music. Other amazing moments have been meeting legendary African musicians like Youssou N’Dour, Salif Keita and Baaba Maal who continue to inspire us and many other young bands to aim for the stars. Lastly, working with Manou Gallo on our album Rising Tide is definitely on this list.

TLE: What’s been your favorite gig so far and why?

Mokoomba: We enjoy performing everywhere we go which makes consensus on this question hard to reach. But if we had to call it then the band’s favorite gig so far was our concert in May to close the Harare International Festival of the Arts. We had a special guest collaboration on stage with the great Baaba Maal from Senegal in front of our home audience and live on national television.

TLE: How do you describe your sound?

Mokoomba: Our sound is Afro fusion hugely inspired by the distinct Tonga traditional music styles and rhythms with influences from Afro-salsa, Congolese Rumba, Funk and Reggae to create a pan-African sound that many are saying bursts with raw energy.

TLE: How long have you known each other and how did you meet?

Mokoomba: We have known each other since we were very young boys growing up in the same neighborhood called Chinotimba in Victoria Falls. We went to the same schools and hung out playing music in our spare time.

TLE: How do you write your songs?

Mokoomba: Mathias Muzaza who is our lead singer comes up with the base concepts for most of the songs and the whole band led by Trustworth Samende our lead guitarist work on the musicality and arrangement.

TLE: What do you think the music reflects about you as people, or is it pure escapism?

Mokoomba: Our music is a combination of influences. There is a strong spiritual foundation based on our commitment to our Tonga culture and our love of traditional rhythms and wisdom of our people. At the same time, we reflect on how tradition speaks to everyday life and issues in society today. In a way, we come from a life with many challenges but the joy we feel and the rhythms, which bring people to their feet, make dance a celebration of life as it is, with no need to “escape”.

TLE: What’s the hardest aspect of being in a band?

Mokoomba: Our band is beginning to travel a lot more and the most challenging aspect is being away from friends and family for long periods of time. We do try to keep in touch with them via the social networks but we cannot say that it is enough.

Use the links below to delve a little deeper.

Facebook

Mokoomba.com

Youtube

Special thanks to Poney Gross @ ZIG ZAG WORLD Management

Until Such Time -the ‘Eye.

Eye to Eye #7 HOWIE PAYNE

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So Friday is upon us once more. This week we have one of the most talented yet unknown singer songwriters (as far as the ‘mainstream’ is concerned) in the UK.  From his early days in various bands in Liverpool to playing with some of the most influential musicians of recent years Howie is not what you’d call a household name. Having said that he did have 5 top 40 hits with The Stands which he fronted until 2005. Since then Howie has released two albums, under his full name, Howard Elliot Payne, on his own label Move City Records. He has also written for and collaborated with other artists such as Ren Harvieu and Benjamin Francis Leftwich.

We think the latest tunes he is currently demoing are among his finest yet. He kindly answered a few questions for us.

TLE: What are you listening to at the moment?

Howie: Loaded by The Velvet Underground.

TLE: What’s the most Rock and Roll situation you have found yourself in? 

Howie: Hard to pin down this..there’s been a few good ones..Neil Young once took me, Noel and Liam Gallagher for dinner..that was pretty far out..long story.

TLE: What’s been your favourite gig so far and why?

Howie: There’s been a lot..The gigs I just did because I haven’t played for a couple of years so there was a bit of nerves, but people came and the vibe was wonderful…
Some of The Bandwagon shows really stand out too. When The Stands, The Zutons and The Coral were all on the same bill in The Zanzibar packed to the rafters with the sweat crawling down the walls..amazing.

TLE: How do you describe your sound?

Howie: It’s circular.

TLE: What’s the ultimate direction for your good self?

Howie: Forwards is the only direction.

TLE: What do you think the music reflects about you or is it pure escapism?

Howie: Sometimes everything, sometimes nothing, It changes line by line, song by song.

TLE: Your sound seems to have mellowed over time, are any of your new songs heavy or heavier than we’ve come to expect?

Howie: I don’t know, I have written a few heavy tunes lately though so it will most likely have it’s moments.

TLE:  How do you choose which songs you keep or give to other artists?

Howie: I don’t really..people get in touch and ask me if I have any songs that might be good for such and such or so and so..

Ren Harvieu covered a few of my songs but I didn’t write any them especially for her or anything like that, her producer just heard them and thought they’d be good songs for her.
I like that it that way, it’s cool, uncomplicated and it’s interesting to hear other people sing your songs.

If I’m collaborating with someone we’d usually start something from scratch or maybe use a really ruff idea off a phone or something.

Sometimes the other person might have an idea they’ve been working on and we’re both into it we’ll work on that.
In The Open that I wrote with Benjamin Francis Leftwich was like that, he already had the idea and and some of the melody so I mainly did the lyrics and a some arranging.

TLE: What do you consider to be your best work?

Howie: What I’m doing now.

To delve a little deeper check out the links below.

Facebook

Twitter

Soundcloud

Until Such Time – the ‘Eye

Eye to Eye #6 STEVE MASON (the Beta Band)

steve mason

King Biscuit Time, Black Affair, SteXiS and another band you may’ve heard of….the Beta Band? It’s not often you get artists like Steve Mason, who remain cult yet mainstream and who continue to make great music after being in such a seminal band. After being in The Beta Band it’s not about living up to what you’ve done, it’s about continuing the journey…

Steve kindly answered a few questions for us.

TLE: What are you listening to at the moment?

Steve: New track by Petula Clark called Cut Copy Me and Vacuum Cleaner by Tintern Abbey.

TLE: What’s the most Rock and Roll situation you have found yourself in? 

Steve: Playing in Vegas in 1999 we sold 1 ticket, cancelled the gig and went on the razz for 2 days. Bumped into Ice-T in the lift and told him what we had done and why. His parting words were “stay stoopid man”. Bizarrely there are many many Beta Band rock n roll tales. We were nuts, just kept it quiet.

TLE: What’s been your favourite gig so far and why?

Steve: Probably the last time I played, which was Village Underground in London. It was a step up from the last time I played there in terms of capacity and I got a bottle thrown at me for laughing about Thatchers death. It’s nice to feel your moving forward!

TLE: How do you describe your sound?

Steve: I don’t.

TLE: How long have you known each other and how did you meet?

Steve: I’ve known myself all my life. I get on famously…

TLE: Has your music evolved since you started playing?

Steve: Of course. If you don’t move forward you ain’t no kind of artist. That’s what its all about. Challenge and truth.

TLE: What are your rehearsals generally like?

Steve: Weird question! They are usually hard work and stressful.

TLE: What’s the ultimate direction for your good self?

Steve: I don’t know. I make it up as I go along.

TLE: How do you write your songs?

Steve: That’s an impossible question to answer.

TLE: What do you think the music reflects about you or is it pure escapism?

Steve: I really don’t know, I think that would be something to ask a 3rd person. I don’t think I could answer that. I have no perspective on it.

TLE: What’s the hardest aspect of being in a band/solo artist?

Steve: These days it’s surviving on the money you make. It’s sometimes frustrating wanting to be able to do things you cannot. Everything is stretched to the max. Especially playing live. I would love to take out a bigger band and play loads of small towns and the cities you rarely get to go play in but promoters just wont take the risk. Fewer and fewer people are going out these days, mostly due again to money issues. Apart from that I don’t have too many problems. I’m very lucky, I don’t earn much, but nobody does. At least I don’t have to bow down to some profit squeezing machine everyday and be treated like a number to earn it.

TLE: What’s the one rule that must remain unbroken?

Steve: Never go back to a lit firework. Metaphorically or otherwise.

TLE: Do you ever tire of the Beta Band comparisons or do you just accept it as inevitable?

Steve: It’s inevitable that the guy that sang and wrote the songs in TBB will be compared to TBB. Standard. I don’t care at all. The British love to live in the past!

TLE: Do you have a space you go to write or are you more wherever whenever?

Steve: Wherever really, just get the phone out and sing into it. I used to carry a dictaphone before mobiles.

TLE: Is the guitar your weapon of choice for songwriting?

Steve: It depends really. Sometimes a song will start with a beat. Get the MPC fired up and put something together. It’s not an exact science, but mostly they will come from some kind of noodling or strumming yes.

To delve a little deeper click on the link below…

SteveMason

Until Such Time – the ‘Eye

Eye to Eye #5 THE DIRTY RIVERS

DirtyRivers

 

 

 

 

Around for about two years now The DIRTY RIVERS are reaching that point that feels like the calm before the storm. The Liverpool five piece are, Mike Ellis-Voice, Jay Roberts-Guitar, Lloyd Shearer-Bass, Ryan Ellis-Guitar, Ben Robinson-Drums. Their sound has been described thus: ‘A little bit of Oasis, a little bit Kasabian and a lot of BRMC’…..

Every now and then a band comes along that has the ingredients we reckon these are they.

Mike kindly answered a few questions for us…

TLE: What are you listening to at the moment?

Mike: The Verve, Slowdive, My Bloody Valentine.

TLE: What’s the most ‘Rock and Roll’ situation the band have found themselves in?

Mike: I suppose if it’s a rock n roll moment, it would probably be when we were booked to play some terrible gig at Telford Uni for their leaving do or something. There was this rugby toff (stripy shirt and all) heckling us right at the front so I volleyed a full pint of lager in his face, he soon shut his trap. We were then advised to leave in case violence broke out, so we robbed all their ale and fucked off!

TLE: What’s been your favourite gig of the bands so far and why?

Mike: Our last London gig at the Queen of Hoxton, everything came together and we were just on fire. Liam Gallagher came down to see us but missed us but came back stage to meet us all, which was good of him.

TLE: How do you describe your sound?

Mike: Rock and Roll

TLE: How long have you known each other and how did you meet?

Mike: Me, Ben and Jay were in one band Lloyd and Ryan were in another, we liked what each other were about, so we joined forces.

TLE: How has your music evolved since you started playing together?

Mike: That’s a good question, when we first started we were happy with any songs that we wrote, they’d go in the set instantly because we weren’t great writers, we just knew how to make a noise and get a bit wild. Now we think about dynamics, really think about arrangements, we’re just getting better at what we do all the time. We just keep on taking it to the next level all the time.

TLE: What are your rehearsals generally like?

Mike: What ever the symptom is, we cure it. If we need more tunes we write one. If we need to improve a part of a tune we spend time addressing it. What ever is necessary.

TLE: What’s the ultimate direction for the band?

Mike: We cant really say to be honest, we can’t control that. What we can control is how good we are live, how good our songs are, how hard we work. If we continue to excel in those departments then we’ll see.

TLE: How do you write your songs?

Mike: There’s loads of different combinations here, it can be a jam, I can come in with a full tune or a part and we’ll finish it off together, Lloyd can come in with a part or we can develop a chord progression Ryan has made or Jay can turn up with an idea. So there’s loads of different ways we can write songs, that’s what makes us a band.

TLE: What do you think the music reflects about you as people, or is it pure escapism?

Mike: Another good question, I think these are tough and dark times and maybe that reflects in the music and lyrics. This isn’t 1967 in Haight-Ashbury, its 2013 in Liverpool where its dark and horrible, where you get one day of actual sunshine a year. The only things I look forward to are rehearsal the next gig and who Everton are playing that week. It’s got a bit of a pissed off vibe going on, which is always a good thing. It feels like we have something we want to prove to people, its got more pain to it.

TLE: What’s the hardest aspect of being in a band?

Mike: There’s nothing that’s really hard to be honest, we know what we’re doing, other bands might find things difficult I suppose, but we’re on the ball man.

TLE: What’s the one rule that must remain unbroken?

Mike: Between the months of November and March, always were two pairs of socks. Always.

Delve deeper using the links below…

Facebook You can download the band’s debut single ‘Black Heart/Filth’ for free from their page.

Twitter

Soundcloud Their new single ‘The Kid’ is released June 17th

TheDirtyRivers.com

Until Such Time – the ‘Eye

Eye to Eye #4 OXYGEN THIEVES

We are not here to ‘review’ or try to convince you how good a band are, we just want to present you with the band, a few words from them and point you in the direction of their songs, vids, gigs etc. Ultimately, the Liverpool Eye is about spreading the word, because if it catches our Eye we believe its worth a shout…

Oxygen Thieves

Deltasonic’s Oxygen Thieves are, Al Fewtrell, Rob Fewtrell, Dan Tilling, Cal McMorran, who are from the Wirral. (We’re starting to wonder if Deltasonic have a lab where they produce their bands!? Either way there’s definitely something in the water over there..) Their influences include Nirvana, Pixies, Pink Floyd, Can, Radiohead and Television. Their music has been described as being filled with ‘intense, dark uncertainty’…

They play Liverpool Calling on 16th June at the Bombed Out Church with British Sea Power and head into the studio in a few weeks to record their next single.

Alex kindly answered some questions for us…

TLE: What are you listening to at the moment?
Alex: I’m currently listening to Suuns – Images du Futur…they’re playing the Kazimier in May and they’re just sick! Also listening to Savages’ debut online in anticipation for it to come out!
TLE: What’s the most ‘Rock and Roll’ situation the band have found themselves in?
Alex: The most rock n roll situation…I’d be lying if I said I liked questions like this. If you’re rock n roll you shouldn’t really think of situations as “rock ‘n’ roll”…but I don’t think I’m rock n roll so I don’t really know what I’m talking about…
TLE: What’s been your favourite gig of the bands so far and why?
Alex: I find with gigs you can have one where you really connect with a crowd and one where you might play really well but no one really understands what you’re getting at but it’s all good experience. The gig where we’ve gone down the best was probably the Kazimier gardens for Festevol. That one went well!
TLE: How do you describe your sound?
Alex: The sound is kind of half New York/Seattle (call it American) sound and half like we’re from the house we grew up in if that makes sense…musically its a bit of the Pixies/Nirvana and a bit Television and a bit Sabbath (unintentionally). I could go on but to be honest I don’t really know how to describe music! Its either good or bad. Doesn’t matter what it comes under.
TLE: How long have you known each other and how did you meet?
Alex: I’ve known my brother Rob since he was born in 1993. We started a band about 3 years ago and got Tilly (our drummer) to join as he was mates with a good mate. And then we acquired Cal a year later as the bassist through the same group of friends…
TLE: How has your music evolved since you started playing together?
Alex: With our music we’ve found we’ve got three kind of era’s where we started off where we didn’t really know what sound we were going for (which is actually a good thing) which turned out to sound a bit like Television. It then went onto a kind of grungier sound and nowadays I’ve been writing more sort of melodic kind of stuff. Kind of sounds all happy and nice but its not. I like a good trick!
TLE: What are your rehearsals generally like?
Alex: Rehearsals are to the point usually. If we write a new song you know if it’s going to be a winner because it will just click really quickly. We tend to make deals with each other where we’ll go through the set a few times and then we can have 20 minutes play time (pool table time)
TLE: What’s the ultimate direction for the band?
Alex: The ultimate direction is to be the best band in the world, not in a competition kind of “I’m better than you” attitude; but you should always be trying to better yourself!
TLE: How do you write your songs?
Alex: Songwriting is an interesting one. Songs come in all directions for me. I sometimes think of a vocal when I’m walking to the bus stop, I sometimes do the typical guitar thing where you play and jump/bump into a new idea. Rob also writes too and then sometimes we write together. Usually one of us has an idea and we sit down and work around it. We’re getting quite good at bouncing off each other these days. It used to be a bit of a competition because we’re brothers!
TLE: What do you think the music reflects about you as people, or is it pure escapism?
Alex: The music I write about is usually what I’m thinking about in my head. I think it’s a good thing to let go of real emotion so things that mean a lot to you. I actually found it hard to do that at first but now I’ll sing about anything. We also like joking about things in a kind of Kinks-esque way!
TLE: What’s the hardest aspect of being in a band?
Alex: The hardest aspect of being in a band is probably getting all your gear to gigs at the moment because we have to do it all ourselves and its just a pain in the arse. Apart from that it’s probably the disagreements when writing between me and my brother but we work around that…sometimes…
TLE: What’s the one rule that must remain unbroken?
Alex: To always have fun!
Click on the Oxygen Thieves Links below to delve deeper…
You can download their debut single Maskara here
Until Such Time – the ‘Eye

Eye to Eye #3 POLTERGEIST

PGeist

 

 

 

Will Sergeant needs no introduction. ‘Least not if you are into music and have been since ,er…time began?

If you don’t know of him, he is of Echo and the Bunnymen fame where he has provided six string sonic wonder for decades. His current side project is POLTERGEIST ( alongside his artistic endeavours http://willsergeant.com ) which also features Les Pattinson (ex-Bunnyman) on bass and Nick Kilroe (current Bunnyman) on drums. What do they sound like? To quote directly from their YouTube “They create a form of rock music with its toes paddling in the dirty progressive ocean foam of the sixties and seventies and its head in the bone dry air of the present day.”

And to quote Will Sergeant himself “There are 12 notes in a scale and we intend to use most of them”

Will kindly answered the following questions for us…

TLE: What are you listening to at the moment?

Will: I have been doing a lot of backtracking of late. Listening to things I liked as a kid. For example, mid period Pink Floyd ‘Ummagumma’ or Phaedra by Tangerine Dream.

TLE: What’s the most Rock and Roll situation the band have found themselves in?

Will: Dropping and smashing a glass of Duvel Lager on David Bowies bare feet just before he was about to go on stage in Paris 1996. He forgave me the next day.

TLE: What’s been your favorite gig(of the bands) so far and why?

Will: Liverpool because of the crowd and I get to kip in my own bed.

TLE: How do you describe your sound?

Will: Dark, Atmospheric, filmic and a cheeky psychedelic finish.

TLE: How long have you known each other and how did you meet?

Will: From Secondary Modern School in the early 70’s from about 11 or 12 years old.

TLE: How has your music evolved since you started playing together?

Will: We are more competent now. We can get everything just right a lot quicker.

TLE: What are your rehearsals generally like?

Will: Loud, intense and fun with many cups of tea and even biscuits sometimes.

TLE: What the ultimate direction for the band?

Will: We never try to direct anything to much, just set off and see where it leads.

TLE: How do you write your songs?

Will: Ideas form in our minds this transfers to our finger tips, then to the metal strings on our instruments creating pleasant vibrations that can change the air pressure on our eardrums. We jam said vibes then to try and improve the construction and arrangement add a bit of fairy dust and bob’s your uncle.

TLE: What do you think the music reflects about you as people, or is it pure escapism?

Will: There are themes and meaning to the songs but we don’t mind the listener having their own journey to the center of the mind. So if escapism you are after we hold the key’s to unlock your mind and set it free.

TLE: What’s the hardest aspect of being in a band?

Will: There are no hard things. We travel the world get treated like gods make people happy and get paid for it.

TLE: What’s the one rule that must remain unbroken?

Will: Never have a shit in the tour bus toilet.

Click on the following to delve deeper into the world of Poltergeist

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POLTERGEIST WEBSITE

-Until Such Time

Eye to Eye #1 – The Tea Street Band

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Welcome to the first instalment of Eye to Eye. We are not here to review or try to convince you how good a band are, we just want to present you with the band, a few words from them and point you in the direction of their songs, vids, gigs etc. Ultimately, the Liverpool Eye is about spreading the word, because if it catches our Eye we believe its worth a shout…
In a nutshell The Tea Street Band represent a good time. When you hear their music you practically have to shield your eyes, as the sunshine that floods from the speakers is that bright. Ibiza springs to mind as do the halcyon days when the rave scene first kicked off. First and foremost though they are a live band, not a bunch of producers and knob twiddlers. Not that twiddling your knob is a bad thing…anyway, we digress…

Right now the band are funding an album via Pledge and we urge you to support. If the tunes we’ve heard so far are anything to go by then they deserve to be on an album and available for you to own. You can pledge here http://www.pledgemusic.com/projects/theteastreetband

Thanks to Timo Tierney from the band for kindly answering  a few questions for us…

TLE: What’s been the bands favorite gig so far and why?

TT: Probably playing New York. Everything about the whole trip was amazing. We played a belter gig and was with great company in The Anfield Wrap lads and SoundCity. Was like a Liverpool Roadshow.

TLE: How long have you known each other and how did you meet?

TT: We’ve known each other well over a decade now.. We’re all best mates. We met in Liverpool Community College and just all got on. All our parents know each other but we didn’t even know that. Weird. If we weren’t playing music we’d still be hanging around together. A band of brothers.
TLE: What are your rehearsals generally like?
TT: Absolutely mad. We have a table tennis table in the room so we spend more time playing that than rehearsing. But we don’t get to see each other as much as we’ like so its very social. 1/4 is playing the rest is just being mates. When we need to work on stuff though we do. We know the job in hand. Over rehearsal though would take the element of interest away for me though. I like playing gigs.. We know the songs inside out.
TLE: What do you think the music reflects about you as people, or is it pure escapism?
TT: No one who listens to our words will know any more about us. The songs I write are obviously real and from me but they all have double meaning. Names of places and items are meant as people. I try and be clever with my words. But the music is totally different and its pure escapism. When I play riffs on Fiesta or Push The Feeling On. I’m not in liverpool.. I’m not me… I escape down the neck of my guitar. So hope people feel the same. Its boss our music. No one else in the world is doing anything like it.

TLE: What’s the one rule that must remain unbroken?

TT: Never take what we do for granted. We were definitely all born to be mates. Born to be in a band together. Its weird I don’t believe in chance. Its all meant to be this music lark. We will get an album done. Its been a long time coming. But to think in one year we’ll have played Dublin, NYC, Australia and main stage at Kendal Calling. That’s unreal and isn’t just luck. We’ve taken a life choice. Dedicated 31 years to this. Can’t take that for granted

 

https://twitter.com/TeaStreetBand

http://theteastreetband.tumblr.com/

http://soundcloud.com/the-tea-street-band

http://www.youtube.com/user/TheTeaStreetBandUk

-Until Such Time